Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Exotic Paddle Series (2)

Here's the second post in my Exotic Paddle Series. Some interesting carved designs from Papua New Guinea.

(From MichaelHamson.com)
This rare paddle comes from the Papuan Gulf area. Canoe paddles from this area are few and far between and this example has striking ancestral faces carved on each side of the blade. The piece was collected by George Craig in the early 1960s. The paddle is 75 ½" in length with the blade being 27" long. The piece dates to the 1940s. Sold


From the Mossgreen Gallery (via The Australian Art Network)

artist: Unknown
Painted and Carved Paddle Circa 1940’s, Papuan Gulf, Length 133cm



3 comments:

huckleberryfinn09 said...

Murat,
I have been following your posts and it looks like your canoe is gonna be one heck of a piece of art. I look forward to seeing it when it's finished.

I told ya that I had finished my first paddle and that I would get some better pictures up for it on my blog. I finally got around to this, in addition to it I made a post about my second paddle and I thought you would like to see it, so here it is.
http://huckleberryfinn09.wordpress.com/2009/04/24/the-engine-part-deux/

Take it easy,
-Phil

Murat said...

Thanks for the link, Phil. Your paddle looks stunning! Something about that mezmerizing grain pattern. Great stuff!

Never worked with Cypress before...I'll see if I can get my hands on some up here. The ball grip design is a good one to prevent tired hands, I'm told. I'm intending to make a ball grip on another paddle blank but it's still in the early stages yet. Right now, I'm sort of rushing to get the canoe completed by end of this week.

huckleberryfinn09 said...

Thanks! Cypress certainly is a unique wood. I would not recommend it to any beginner wood worker that is for sure. I struggled quite a bit with how easily in splinters and splits, I had a next to impossible time sanding it. It is a wonderful wood if you are looking for a challenge so I would say go for it.

Best of luck finishing your canoe, just don't rush too much, you are at the most critical stage when all of the major mistakes happen of any project. Of course I am sure you already know this ;)

Good luck
-Phil

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